From The Mind of a Muggle

Hello! You're looking lovely today.

204,970 notes

the-super-scout:

helioscentrifuge:

runtime-err0r:

itsvondell:

you can take one man’s trash to another man’s treasure but you can’t make it drink

Fun fact: the blending of idioms or cliches is called a malaphor.

My personal favorite is “We’ll burn that bridge when we get to it.”

I looked it up b/c that was a very familiar idiom and how could it be wrong but then

image

yeah wow that’s spot on perfect

my catchphrase

(via burn-z)

Filed under TAGGED TO HOLD ONTO

331 notes

thatkidinschoolnooneliked asked: Do you have anything about writing Indians (who are from India, not Native American)?

writingwithcolor:

lightningrani:

writingwithcolor:

Writing Indian Characters

Hey!

So the first thing that pops into my head when I think about writing Indian characters (as a second gen immigrant who was born in India and moved to America) is the overwhelming diversity within just the blanket term “Indian character.”

Writing Indian Characters in India

North Indians and South Indians are very different from each other. Things change dramatically from state to state as well, whether you’re talking about the food or the language or the style of clothing. There’s also religious diversity in that while the dominant religion in India is Hinduism, there are also Muslim Indians and Sikh Indians and Buddhist Indians, all of which have different perspectives on what it means to be Indian. India right now also has a pretty large age span, where with the population boom, there are just as many old people with prejudices as there are young people with liberal mindsets. India’s also at a point now where it’s an up and coming country, with values and goals of young people changing rapidly. The information age hit India pretty hard, and there’s large discrepancies between the rural areas with few, if any, accesses to technology, and the urban settings where there’s large amounts of technology everywhere you look. 

That’s the main thing I would try and keep in mind when writing characters IN India — just the ridiculous amount of diversity and change that’s happening now in India. Young people there also have this mindset there that the Western world is better and everyone seems to want to immigrate to American or Britain when they grow up. 

If you’re talking about writing Indians in Western countries, like immigrant stories, that’s another story.

Writing the Indian Diaspora

There, it’s still important to keep in mind the diversity of India because that could change the perspective your character has on the Western world as well. Research is once again, your best friend. Research holidays that your character might celebrate like Rakhi and Holi and Diwali, research religions and the religious holidays (Hinduism has an enormous amount of gods and goddesses and holidays for them as well). Research where in India your character is from, because that colors things differently too. As I said, South Indians and North Indians especially have different views on a lot of different things. 

The other thing about Indians living away from India is that they’ll find each other. Literally everywhere we’ve lived in my life we have had neighbors and communities of Indian people that we would collaborate on showing Indian movies in local movie theaters with, people we would send things to India for our family with and ask them to bring things back for us. We’d put on festivals and shows and dances and things with them.

Of course, you can’t forget the racism either. As a brown girl growing up, you get made fun of for how you smell, how you wear your hair, the clothes you wear, and then you also get to watch as everyone grows up and ~discovers~ these things and wears henna and bindis as if they’d never made fun of you for doing the same thing before.

That’s about all I have off the top of my head. If you have any other specific questions, feel free to send them in, and we’ll do our best to help!

If any other Indian followers have anything to add to this, please let us know as well!

-Mod Satvika

I feel like I should add something…. Take what I say with a grain of salt.

1. It’s pretty simple to divide India into North and South… but there can be some more distinctions: Bengali, Gujarati, Punjabi, etc. I’m not actually part of those groups (so I can’t really say how different they are) but I’m pretty sure there are some pretty distinct traditions in those groups.

2. Feel like I should mention the existence of Northeastern Indians, at least. They aren’t usually what people think of when they think of India… but they exist.

3. Don’t assume that the Indian character knows another language other than English, if they grow up in India. (And don’t necessarily assume that the language is Hindi, especially if your character is from South India). At least in the Indian community where I grew up most of the 2nd gen immigrants could understand the language but had limited abilities in speaking or writing. But it depends.

4. And remember that people in India can speak English too? Their fluency probably depends on their education level (most schools teach it as a second language, if I remember correctly) and how often they use it. 

5. Also a reminder that the holidays mentioned above are Hindu holidays so Indian people of other religions may not celebrate them if they’re not living in India. (I was raised Hindu sooooo I don’t know how true this statement is but I thought I might as well mention it?)

6. Oh, and a reminder that Indian movies != Bollywood. Bollywood is one of the film industries in India, producing Hindi language films. I believe there’s a pretty big Telugu film industry? But Bollywood movies are still the most popular. At least in the circles i run in.

Everything else sounds chill. 

All very good adds! Thank you!

-mod Satvika

Filed under Writing is hard

2,846 notes

pureempath:

i —— foreword

Fairly recently I realized that a lot of writers and US citizens alike don’t really know and fully understand their rights when being arrested/interrogated.  This is mostly a writing guide but if you’re a US citizen this stuff is just useful to know.  Basically, the police won’t tell you most of your rights aside from what you know — but they don’t even explain those.  I hope this helps. 

ii —— being arrested

If you are not served with a warrant, the police can not arrest you.  They can say they have one, but unless they show it to you, you don’t have to cooperate with them.  Upon being arrested, you will be read your rights.
        “You have the right to remain silent.  Anything you say           or do can be held against you in the court of law.  You           have the right to an attorney, if you can not afford one           you will be provided one without any cost to you.”
Every so often the police officers fail to say this to the suspect before the questioning session and usually that results in negative consequences for the officers involved.  What they don’t tell you is that you are allowed to have an attorney present before and during your questioning.  They also don’t tell you that what you don’t say and do can be held against you.  An example of this is, say you’re being accused of murder.  If you sit there expressionless and stoic while they’re telling you that you killed your mother its gonna seem suspicious and they can use that in their favor.  Now, in that same respect if you sit there sweating and vehemently denying it — they can use that against you as well.
Alright, they also don’t tell you that you can accidentally forfeit your ‘right to remain silent’ (fifth amendment right).  If you say “I didn’t kill my mother.” you just gave up your right to remain silent.  They will likely try to provoke you to say something like this that will make you give up this right.  That’s why you want a lawyer present during and before your questioning.

iii —— interrogation techniques

There are a lot so I’ll only be outlining a few major things.  Additionally, this guide is only applicable to lawful interrogations of arrested individuals that are US citizens and do not fall under the “terrorist" category, because military interrogations are quite a bit different.  I might touch on that later.
The room is set up strategically.  In almost every interrogation room, there is a table, two chairs, and a mirror/one way glass.  The suspect sits on one side of the table, a police officer on the other, and the interrogator stands.  The sitting police officer serves to corroborate and support the other police officer, or participate in the good cop/bad cop facade.  The one sitting will usually pretend to be more friendly and try to feed you the age old lie “if you just tell the truth it won’t be as bad”.
The sitting cop will also look for microexpressions and pay attention to body language while the standing cop will generally pace around and give off aggressive vibes to intimidate you, the suspect.
On rare occasions, you can be questioned without being served a warrant.  During these times, you have not been read your rights most likely and you do not have to cooperate.  Sometimes its in your best interest, other times its not.  Either way you don’t have to stay.  On other occasions they are allowed to detain you for up to 12 hours but that is exceptionally rare.
The police officers questioning you will try to make you trip up on your own story.  They do this mainly by trying to speed up the process so you have less time to think and process — the aggressive body language comes into play here.  If you feel threatened you’re more likely to stutter and stumble around than if you have a clear mind.
If they’re having a difficult time getting you to start talking, they’ll ask you harmless questions — questions usually about your family members, your birthday, etc.  These are always things they know already but it gets the metaphorical ball rolling.  Along with that, they can establish a baseline of what your body language is when you’re telling the truth so they know when you’re lying.

iv —— "enhanced interrogation" techniques

As far as the less lawful interrogations go, just keep in mind that all pain would have to start at a minimal level and incrementally increase in intensity to be effective.  You also have to factor in disorientation due to pain and possibly blood loss.  At a certain point in time, your subject will realize they are going to die and there is no going back and they will stop caring.  If they think it could possibly stop, you can get information out of them.  There always has to be the possibility of getting out of it alive.  Or you could also kidnap someone close to them and hurt them in front of your subject if that works.
The most commonly known about method is waterboarding, but its not the most widely used.  The mechanics are basic, actually.  Some sort of material is wrapped over the subject’s head — like a thick canvas material, or plastic — and water is poured over it.  Essentially they feel like their drowning but you are just asphyxiating them.  Its more mental torture than anything else.
Sometimes hypothermia is used, and that is basically just taking the subject’s clothing and putting them in a room about 50* F.  Then every couple of minutes the subject is doused in cold water.
A very common technique is to shake the subject and that is fairly self explanatory, I believe.  Not enough to hurt them, just enough to instill fear that you will.  An open handed slap to the face or abdomen is also used.  Punching is usually not employed by the government because it harms the prisoner, but if you’re talking about another country or a rogue operative, maybe a drug dealer — who knows.
Sometimes it is as simple as making the subject stand in one place in the same position for hours.  It causes intense strain on the muscles and is usually quite effective.

v —— end thoughts

I could have gotten a lot more in depth on a lot of this but I felt I covered it enough to give a general idea.  I do hope this helps people write these sort of things more accurately, or maybe even if they get into a scuttle with law enforcement (which I hope does not happen).  If you have any questions, comments, or anything additional that I should add, don’t hesitate to contact me.

pureempath:

i —— foreword

Fairly recently I realized that a lot of writers and US citizens alike don’t really know and fully understand their rights when being arrested/interrogated.  This is mostly a writing guide but if you’re a US citizen this stuff is just useful to know.  Basically, the police won’t tell you most of your rights aside from what you know — but they don’t even explain those.  I hope this helps. 

ii —— being arrested

If you are not served with a warrant, the police can not arrest you.  They can say they have one, but unless they show it to you, you don’t have to cooperate with them.  Upon being arrested, you will be read your rights.

        “You have the right to remain silent.  Anything you say
          or do can be held against you in the court of law.  You
          have the right to an attorney, if you can not afford one
          you will be provided one without any cost to you.”

Every so often the police officers fail to say this to the suspect before the questioning session and usually that results in negative consequences for the officers involved.  What they don’t tell you is that you are allowed to have an attorney present before and during your questioning.  They also don’t tell you that what you don’t say and do can be held against you.  An example of this is, say you’re being accused of murder.  If you sit there expressionless and stoic while they’re telling you that you killed your mother its gonna seem suspicious and they can use that in their favor.  Now, in that same respect if you sit there sweating and vehemently denying it — they can use that against you as well.

Alright, they also don’t tell you that you can accidentally forfeit your ‘right to remain silent’ (fifth amendment right).  If you say “I didn’t kill my mother.” you just gave up your right to remain silent.  They will likely try to provoke you to say something like this that will make you give up this right.  That’s why you want a lawyer present during and before your questioning.

iii —— interrogation techniques

There are a lot so I’ll only be outlining a few major things.  Additionally, this guide is only applicable to lawful interrogations of arrested individuals that are US citizens and do not fall under the “terrorist" category, because military interrogations are quite a bit different.  I might touch on that later.

The room is set up strategically.  In almost every interrogation room, there is a table, two chairs, and a mirror/one way glass.  The suspect sits on one side of the table, a police officer on the other, and the interrogator stands.  The sitting police officer serves to corroborate and support the other police officer, or participate in the good cop/bad cop facade.  The one sitting will usually pretend to be more friendly and try to feed you the age old lie “if you just tell the truth it won’t be as bad”.

The sitting cop will also look for microexpressions and pay attention to body language while the standing cop will generally pace around and give off aggressive vibes to intimidate you, the suspect.

On rare occasions, you can be questioned without being served a warrant.  During these times, you have not been read your rights most likely and you do not have to cooperate.  Sometimes its in your best interest, other times its not.  Either way you don’t have to stay.  On other occasions they are allowed to detain you for up to 12 hours but that is exceptionally rare.

The police officers questioning you will try to make you trip up on your own story.  They do this mainly by trying to speed up the process so you have less time to think and process — the aggressive body language comes into play here.  If you feel threatened you’re more likely to stutter and stumble around than if you have a clear mind.

If they’re having a difficult time getting you to start talking, they’ll ask you harmless questions — questions usually about your family members, your birthday, etc.  These are always things they know already but it gets the metaphorical ball rolling.  Along with that, they can establish a baseline of what your body language is when you’re telling the truth so they know when you’re lying.

iv —— "enhanced interrogation" techniques

As far as the less lawful interrogations go, just keep in mind that all pain would have to start at a minimal level and incrementally increase in intensity to be effective.  You also have to factor in disorientation due to pain and possibly blood loss.  At a certain point in time, your subject will realize they are going to die and there is no going back and they will stop caring.  If they think it could possibly stop, you can get information out of them.  There always has to be the possibility of getting out of it alive.  Or you could also kidnap someone close to them and hurt them in front of your subject if that works.

The most commonly known about method is waterboarding, but its not the most widely used.  The mechanics are basic, actually.  Some sort of material is wrapped over the subject’s head — like a thick canvas material, or plastic — and water is poured over it.  Essentially they feel like their drowning but you are just asphyxiating them.  Its more mental torture than anything else.

Sometimes hypothermia is used, and that is basically just taking the subject’s clothing and putting them in a room about 50* F.  Then every couple of minutes the subject is doused in cold water.

A very common technique is to shake the subject and that is fairly self explanatory, I believe.  Not enough to hurt them, just enough to instill fear that you will.  An open handed slap to the face or abdomen is also used.  Punching is usually not employed by the government because it harms the prisoner, but if you’re talking about another country or a rogue operative, maybe a drug dealer — who knows.

Sometimes it is as simple as making the subject stand in one place in the same position for hours.  It causes intense strain on the muscles and is usually quite effective.

v —— end thoughts

I could have gotten a lot more in depth on a lot of this but I felt I covered it enough to give a general idea.  I do hope this helps people write these sort of things more accurately, or maybe even if they get into a scuttle with law enforcement (which I hope does not happen).  If you have any questions, comments, or anything additional that I should add, don’t hesitate to contact me.

(Source: pureempath--archived, via writeworld)

Filed under Writing is hard

52,630 notes

A couple reminders for everybody headed back to school

keepcalmstay-s-t-r-o-n-g:

• your mental health is more important than your grades/school work
• you are fabulous
• they’re probably not even paying attention when you give a presentation
• one friend is better than no friends
• eat a healthy lunch
• take care of yourself
• please stay safe
• your mental health is more important than your grades/school work
• I love you

(via kat-rising-demon)

Filed under Stay Safe

2,782,522 notes

Don't ever hesitate. Reblog this. TUMBLR RULE. When you see it, REBLOG IT.

The original post only has US helplines. I've added UK helplines underneath. It would be great if people could add numbers from everywhere in the world.
Depression Hotline:
1-630-482-9696
Suicide Hotline:
1-800-784-8433
LifeLine:
1-800-273-8255
Trevor Project:
1-866-488-7386
Sexuality Support:
1-800-246-7743
Eating Disorders Hotline:
1-847-831-3438
Rape and Sexual Assault:
1-800-656-4673
Grief Support:
1-650-321-5272
Runaway:
1-800-843-5200, 1-800-843-5678, 1-800-621-4000
Exhale:
After Abortion Hotline/Pro-Voice: 1-866-4394253
Child Abuse:
1-800-422-4453
UK Helplines:
Samaritans (for any problem):
08457909090 e-mail jo@samaritans.org
Childline (for anyone under 18 with any problem):
08001111
Mind infoline (mental health information):
0300 123 3393 e-mail: info@mind.org.uk
Mind legal advice (for people who need mental-health related legal advice):
0300 466 6463 legal@mind.org.uk
b-eat eating disorder support:
0845 634 14 14 (only open Mon-Fri 10.30am-8.30pm and Saturday 1pm-4.30pm) e-mail: help@b-eat.co.uk
b-eat youthline (for under 25's with eating disorders):
08456347650 (open Mon-Fri 4.30pm - 8.30pm, Saturday 1pm-4.30pm)
Cruse Bereavement Care:
08444779400 e-mail: helpline@cruse.org.uk
Frank (information and advice on drugs):
0800776600
Drinkline:
0800 9178282
Rape Crisis England & Wales:
0808 802 9999 1(open 2 - 2.30pm 7 - 9.30pm) e-mail info@rapecrisis.org.uk
Rape Crisis Scotland:
08088 01 03 02 every day, 6pm to midnight
India Self Harm Hotline:
00 08001006614
India Suicide Helpline:
022-27546669
Kids Help Phone (Canada):
1-800-668-6868, Free and available 24/7
suicide hotlines;
Argentina:
54-0223-493-0430
Australia:
13-11-14
Austria:
01-713-3374
Barbados:
429-9999
Belgium:
106
Botswana:
391-1270
Brazil:
21-233-9191
China:
852-2382-0000
(Hong Kong:
2389-2222)
Costa Rica:
606-253-5439
Croatia:
01-4833-888
Cyprus:
357-77-77-72-67
Czech Republic:
222-580-697, 476-701-908
Denmark:
70-201-201
Egypt:
762-1602
Estonia:
6-558-088
Finland:
040-5032199
France:
01-45-39-4000
Germany:
0800-181-0721
Greece:
1018
Guatemala:
502-234-1239
Holland:
0900-0767
Honduras:
504-237-3623
Hungary:
06-80-820-111
Iceland:
44-0-8457-90-90-90
Israel:
09-8892333
Italy:
06-705-4444
Japan:
3-5286-9090
Latvia:
6722-2922, 2772-2292
Malaysia:
03-756-8144
(Singapore:
1-800-221-4444)
Mexico:
525-510-2550
Netherlands:
0900-0767
New Zealand:
4-473-9739
New Guinea:
675-326-0011
Nicaragua:
505-268-6171
Norway:
47-815-33-300
Philippines:
02-896-9191
Poland:
52-70-000
Portugal:
239-72-10-10
Russia:
8-20-222-82-10
Spain:
91-459-00-50
South Africa:
0861-322-322
South Korea:
2-715-8600
Sweden:
031-711-2400
Switzerland:
143
Taiwan:
0800-788-995
Thailand:
02-249-9977
Trinidad and Tobago:
868-645-2800
Ukraine:
0487-327715

527 notes

Anonymous asked: What are the steps to designing a fictional disease?

characterandwritinghelp:

LET’S INFECT SOME PEOPLE.

Inside this post: Not so much a step-by-step, but a bulleted list of things to consider when creating a fictional disease, sickness, infection, illness, or ailment, as brought to you by someone who is not a doctor and knows very very little about actual, real medicine. Anyone with better information and more knowledge is absolutely free to correct and add to this post. -Headless

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Filed under Writing is hard